Sunday, October 5, 2014

Model Stamp Mill Expert, Morris Jackson


I have known Morris Jackson over 30 years and he is the person that got me involved with mining. He started in building stamp mill models with the construction of an entire mill building, built with a stamp mill model in October 2009. From there he worked on a 1:48 scale model stamp mill about 30” tall. Around that time period he worked on a model incline and a framework structure to encase the Swallow Mine Stamp mill exhibit at the Arizona Mining & Mineral Museum. The picture below shows his early pieces:  


From there he worked on adding various attachments to the models, including feeders of various types, sluice tables, jackstands and mortar boxes. He also made variations on those attachments and the following is a sample of the various configurations for stamp mills that he came up with. He also makes three scales, the small scale 1:24 @ 13” tall, 1:36 scale @ 22” tall and a 1:48 @ 30 “tall. He made 2-stamp, 3-stamp, 4-stamp, 5-stamp, 10-stamp and 20-stamp with battery or 120 volt electric power. The table below covers the variations.  



The mills are made up of the similar basic parts; just the parts are different sizes based on the scale that is used. As already stated there are (3) scales 1:24, 1:36 and 1:48. You can see the different components for a stamp mill below:


The next part of this report shows all of the various stamp mill sizes, configurations and power configurations. Many of the stamp mills are designed from actual stamp mills from various areas. If you have an unusual stamp mill and would like a model, Morris can probably accommodate your needs. We will start out with the 20 stamp mill and work our way down to the 2-stamp mill:
















The next picture shows the difference between the large and the small mills. The large mills are 1:48 and the small mills are 1:24. The smaller models are more of an HO gauge.







The final picture shows the stamp mill model expert with an entire mill building with a primary jaw crusher, 10-stamp mill, shaker tables and all of the drive belts to run the equipment. He will make these buildings on request.


There are (4) videos below that discuss stamp mills in detail and also run the mills so that you can get a feel for what they do.

All you have to do is highlight the site, left click on the highlighted site and it will tell you to "Go to Link", then click on that statement and it will bring up the video. 



  
6 Floor Level Operating Stamp Mill Building http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdsPE62Ivvs

6 Floor Level Operating Stamp Mill Building http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EXPgVCJBao



If you are interested in purchasing one of these stamp mills, mill building or a special mill you would like made, you can contact the Stamp Mill Model Expert at 623-877-0288 or email at morrisjackson5@aol.com.


4 comments:

  1. That is a venerable project. I think it's very comprehensive. That should provide us with extensive reference for mining infrastructures of different geographic set-ups and contexts. That should be extremely helpful for those who are just starting to invest in the industry. Thanks for sharing! All the best!

    Rosemary Bailey @ Wabi Iron & Steel Corp.

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  2. This is great. I think that it's fascinating to see old equipment that was once used. It's good to restore them to their original condition for others to see. Have people been able to use these after they were restored? http://www.mangelsdorfengineering.com.au

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    Replies
    1. Gary
      Many of the stamp mill models in this article have had the original stamp mills restored back to operations. There are at least (4) models that I have worked on with the original stamp mills back in operation at museums. They are not production mills, but run and crush ore just like they did originally back in the late 1800's and early 1900's.
      Charlie Connell

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  3. Does anyone know how to get a hold of Morris or Charlie? I'm interested in buying a stamp mill model.

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